Bricklayers Insurance

Public liability insurance for brickies

For most self-employed bricklayers public liability insurance is a must.

Many worksites will have mandatory public liability requirements, but many tradesmen are unsure exactly why they need this insurance and how it might help them.

In this guide we will look at what this form cover actually does for bricklayers, which ones need it and how much it will cost.

What is it?

Public liability can protect a bricklayer from the costs of a claim involving property damage or personal injury to another person.

If you are found to have acted negligently you could be up for some serious costs, but with the right insurance in place you can rely on the insurer to cover the costs.

Claims for property damage and personal injury can occur very easily for bricklayer, or for any tradesman for that matter.

A minor property damage claim could arise from something as simple as dropping a brick chipping an expensive tile.

A personal injury claim on the other hand could involve collapsed brickwork which results in a serious injury or even death.

Which brickies need it?

Generally speaking it is bricklayers who work for their own business or as a subcontractor who need public liability cover.

If you are working on wages you will generally be covered by your employer’s insurance, but it is still worth checking with your employer to ensure you are not left exposed.

Some worksites have mandatory public liability requirements for all tradies on site, but even if that’s not the case for you it is still worth considering.

How much does it cost?

Bricklayers are generally considered to be a fairly low insurance risk for public liability, which is great news because it means the premiums are also quite low.

The public liability cost for a brickie can be from as little as $400 for someone doing standard residential work on their own.

Getting a quote is the best way to find out the cost of your insurance, and you can do this easily by completing our online quote request or talking to your existing broker.

Other policies

Although our website focuses mainly on public liability, there are other forms of cover that a brickie can benefit from.

Income protection is the common form of bricklayers insurance behind public liability, and other popular covers include tool insurance and life insurance.

If you would like more information about public liability or any other form of business cover please contact us.

Tradies Insurance

For tradies there is one form of insurance that is by far the most common – public liability insurance.

As a self-employed tradie, including subbies, public liability is vital to protect you and your business if something goes wrong on the job.

In this guide we’ll look at what public liability for tradies covers, how much it costs and exactly who needs it.

If you just want to get a quote, click here.

What is public liability?

Public liability insurance is designed to cover a tradesman in the event that their negligence results in property damage or personal injury to a third party.

At the lower end we have small claims involving property damage.

A small property damage claim could involve the classic foot through the ceiling accident.  The insurance would cover the cost of repairing the damage and repainting the ceiling.

At the upper end we have claims involving personal injury, or even death.  This is where things get serious.

If your negligence resulted in the death of a third party, and you were sued for damages, your policy would respond.

These cases can stretch into the hundreds of thousands for serious injuries, and potentially millions for a death, so having the right insurance in place is absolutely vital.

Public liability cost for a tradie

Despite offering a huge amount of protection, public liability insurance is actually very cheap for a tradesman.

For the standard trades such as carpentry and electrical, a $5 million dollar policy can cost as little as $400 for a one-person business.

The larger your business, and the more hazardous your occupation, the higher the premium will be.

Also affecting the cost of your insurance will be the locations you work in.  Specifically, and locations that are considered hazardous or major public spaces.

Such locations can include airports, railway stations, power stations, oil rigs and the like.  If you work in or on any of these locations, you can expect to pay more for your insurance.

It’s vital that you do tell your insurance broker about this type of work, otherwise you may find that your policy does not cover you in the event of a claim.

To find out exactly how much this important form of tradies insurance could cost you, follow this link to our online quote form.

Which tradies need public liability?

If you have an ABN, then you’ll probably need public liability insurance.

Any self-employed tradie, whether you operate as a sole trader, partnership, trust or company, will need public liability insurance.

This includes those who subcontract to other builders.  Don’t think that the builder’s insurance will cover you, because in most cases it will not.

In terms of how much cover you need, it really depends on the work you are doing.

Cover is available in amounts of $5 million, $10 million and $20 million.

For a typical residential tradie, $5 million will be sufficient.  That being said, the cost to go from $5m to $10m isn’t much, so many tradies choose to double their cover.

If you are working in locations such as shopping centres and schools, there is a good chance you’ll be required to have the maximum cover of $20m.

Changing your level of cover is easy though, so even if you start with $5m and have to increase it later, it’s really not a big deal.

Purchasing a policy

There are a few different ways for a tradie to purchase a public liability policy.

For most tradies undertaking standard trades work, the easiest and cheapest option will be to go online.

Online providers such as Trade Risk can provide you with instant quotes via their website, and you can buy the policy online and get a certificate of currency emailed straight away.

It’s always important to read through the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) before purchasing a policy, to ensure the policy is right for you.

If you’re unsure, then it’s highly recommended that you speak with an insurance broker who can run through everything with you.

Most brokers will happily deal with you over the phone or even via email, so there’s no need to make an appointment at a local broker’s office like the old days.

Public liability is super important for tradies, as well as being very affordable and easy to buy.  It’s undoubtedly a vital part of your toolkit.

Carpenter Insurance

One of the most common forms of carpenter insurance is public liability.

This is the insurance that will save your back if you cause property damage or personal injury to another person.

Whilst public liability certainly isn’t the only form of business insurance a chippie should consider, it is arguably the most important.

In this guide we’ll take a detailed look at public liability insurance for carpenters.

If you’re just looking for some quotes, click the button below.

Public Liability Insurance QLD Quote

What does it cover?

Public liability insurance will protect a carpenter in the event that their negligence results in property damage or personal injury to another person.

Whether you damage someone else’s property whilst on the job, or cause injury to that person, your public liability will respond.

Your policy will generally also cover the cost of defending a claim.  For example if someone tries to sue you for negligence, even if you are eventually found to be in the right, your policy will cover your legal expenses to get that outcome.

Claim examples

When it comes to carpenters and public liability, there are small claims and there can be big claims!

Small claims typically involve property damage.  For example you might be in a client’s roof and you put your foot through the ceiling.

The plaster repairs and painting could cost a couple of grand, which is enough to wipe out the week’s profit, but not enough to be life changing.

This type of event would be covered by public liability, saving you potentially a couple of grand.

At the other end of the scale we have the big claims, which more often involve personal injury.

An example here could be that you’ve built a deck for a house and that deck subsequently fails, resulting in serious injury or death to those on the deck.

If you are found to have been negligent in some way which contributed to the accident, you could be up for hundreds of thousands – if not millions – of dollars in damages.

Your public liability insurance policy would also respond in this case.

Public liability claims are rarely black and white, and the above examples would be subject to all sorts of issues, but it does give you an idea.

Is it mandatory for carpenters?

Unlike electricians and plumbers who typically have mandatory public liability insurance requirements for their licence, chippies do not.

Whilst the government might not have any insurance requirements for carpenters, building companies often will.

Many builders will require that all trades – including carpenters – show evidence of their public liability insurance before being allowed on site.

Evidence is generally in the form of your certificate of currency, which outlines the details of your insurance.

Regardless of whether or not you are required to hold public liability for your licence or through a building contract, it is still an incredibly important form of cover for any self-employed carpenter.

How much does it cost?

Carpentry is seen as a fairly low risk when it comes to public liability insurance, which thankfully means the cost is very low.

For the minimum $5 million cover, premiums start from around $400 per year depending on the insurer.

The cost can rise depending on a number of factors including the size of your business and any work considering high risk, or in high risk locations.

Examples of high risk locations include mine sites, airports and other similar sites.

If your trade is a carpenter but you’re really undertaking the work of a builder, you’ll need to insure yourself as such.  This will typically be a little more expensive, but it’s far more important to be properly insured in the event of a claim.

More information

To obtain further advice or quotes on carpenters insurance the best option is to speak with an insurance broker.

A broker can compare multiple quotes for you, as well as providing advice on what types of policies are best for your carpentry business.

Flooring Contractors Insurance

A flooring contractor may require a range of different insurance types depending on how they operate.

Public liability is certainly one of the most important forms of cover, but it’s not the only one.

For self-employed flooring contractors, public liability will be a must, whilst almost all contractors can benefit from tool insurance and income protection.

In this guide we’ll run through the needs of flooring contractors and how an insurance broker can make the insurance process easier and more affordable.

Flooring Contractors

The term flooring contractor is quite broad, and covers a large range of occupations and business types.

Some of the common activities which are covered under flooring contractors insurance include the following:

  • Installation of carpet and vinyl floors
  • Floating timber floors
  • Polished concrete floors
  • Floor repairs
  • Timber floor polishing
  • Commercial flooring

Virtually any business activities which fall under the flooring contractor category can be insured, however if you undertake any activities which are a little ‘out of the ordinary’ it’s important to let us know.

Insurance Types

There are three main types of insurance which flooring contractors can benefit from, however depending on the size and structure of your business you may require additional cover.

Whilst our website does focus on public liability insurance, it’s important not to limit yourself to a single policy.  Insuring all of your risks is vital.

The three main forms of cover are detailed below.

Public Liability

No matter what your trade is, the most commonly required form of insurance is public liability.

Public liability insurance will cover you in the event that your flooring activities result in property damage or personal injury to another person.

A typical personal injury claim could involve an incident where you have left some flooring materials in a walkway without sufficient marking, and a member of the public has tripped over them and suffered an injury.

A typical property damage claim could involve something as simple as breaking a window whilst carrying materials or equipment through a client’s premises.

Public liability is primarily for business owners, contractors and subcontractors.  If you are working as an employee on wages you should be covered by your employer’s policy.

For more information about this cover please view .

Tool Insurance

This is another common form of tradies insurance for anyone operating in the building and construction industry.

Tool insurance will cover your gear in the event that it is stolen, damaged by fire or damaged in a vehicle collision or rollover.

If you are leaving gear on site overnight, such as large timber or concrete floor polishers that aren’t easily transported each night, you can also obtain special cover for these.

More information about tool insurance can be found by following the links on our website.

Income Protection

The last of the ‘big three’ form of trade insurance is income protection.

Regardless of whether you’re a business owner or an employee, income protection is an important way of protecting your income in the event that you cannot work for a period of time due to illness or injury.

A proper income protection policy must be obtained via a financial adviser rather than an insurance broker.

Other Insurances

If you work on your own and don’t operate from your own premises, the three basic forms of insurance listed above will take care of most of your needs.

But if you are operating a larger business, perhaps with a few staff and running from your own workshop, then you’ll need to consider additional forms of cover.

Some of these covers include contract works insurance, business interruption and property damage cover.

Advice and Quotes

The job of an insurance broker is to help you to protect yourself, your business and your family with the right insurance to suit your needs and your budget.

They can assist flooring contractors with anything from basic quotes through to comprehensive advice on their overall insurance needs.

To obtain quotes on your insurance please click here.